Wednesday, March 2, 2016

IWSG: It’s Never Beyond Repair!


I was able to make a trip back to my hometown two weekends ago to spend some time with my son, d-i-l and grandson. It was my first visit back since an abrupt and distressing move across the state just before the holidays. Besides seeing author friends and spending quality time with the family, I discovered something very important in relation to my writing life.



This handsome lad is my eight-year old grandson but he’s not the lesson. It’s the pasty, fowl looking fellow behind him. I inherited my mother’s porch goose some 15 years ago. Though I wasn’t particularly fond of it, I enjoyed the creative process of dressing it up for the holidays as a reminder of her. When it followed me to my apartment, there was no place to display it so it was tucked away in neglect on my third floor patio. I didn’t think much of it until 300 pounds of ice slid off the roof and crushed my patio chair and broke the goose’s neck. Poor thing with just a piece of heavy gauge wire holding severed head at an unattractive angle. When my sudden move came up, no one wanted to carry that heavy piece of damaged statuary down three flights of stairs, so the once proud family mascot was left behind. Until during my visit my son surprised me with Mom’s goose, neck replastered and good as new. I’d given up on my feathered friend too soon.

Lugging porch goose back to my new home, I was filled with nostalgia and excitement. It had taken the caring handiwork of my son to show me that I’d given up on something I’d once loved prematurely. All it took was a little TLC from another to make me appreciate it again.

It made me think of something else I’d dragged across the state, boxed and nearly forgotten. Those fragments of stories, those submitted, rejected and never retooled manuscripts I’d given up on, the long out of print books I had the rights to but never did anything with. Maybe I gave up on them too soon. Maybe it’s time to reevaluate their worth, to spruce them up, let others take a look at them to help me fix problems I thought irreparable.

What have you given up on and tucked away, thinking there was no point in trying to save it? It’s time to take it out, boot it up and see if that original spark fires again. Make spring cleaning into a time of creative rebirth.

Happy Spring (even though we still have to shovel to find it!)


Purpose: To share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all kinds!

Posting: The first Wednesday of every month is officially Insecure Writer’s Support Group day. Post your thoughts on your own blog. Talk about your doubts and the fears you have conquered. Discuss your struggles and triumphs. Offer a word of encouragement for others who are struggling. Visit others in the group and connect with your fellow writer - aim for a dozen new people each time.

Let’s rock the neurotic writing world!


Twitter hashtag is #IWSG 

IWSG awesome co-hosts for the March 2nd posting will be Lauren Hennessy, Lisa Buie-Collard, Lidy, Christine Rains, and Mary Aalgaard!

20 comments:

  1. Great advice, Nancy! I needed to hear that. Off to work on my snow day. (Bonus!)

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    1. Off to work AND had to shovel my way in! What a way to start the day.

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  2. I love this idea. I also love the idea you may have a lot of books coming out from those that didn't fit the zeitgeist of one time but may be totally perfect for now!

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  3. This year, I started pulling out my short stories that had been rejected and re-editing them for submission. Thank you for passing along your ideas.
    Shalom,
    Patricia

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    1. Good for you, Patricia! Best of luck with them.

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  4. I'm currently working on a ms. that I started probably ten years ago, determined to finish it this go around. So glad the goose is home again!

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  5. That is a nice lesson. I'm glad your son repaired the goose and that seeing that made you see how valuable your unfinished work is. Unpack those stories and take a look at them. You may be surprised. :)

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    1. Thanks, Chrys! Now to dig my way to them . . .

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  6. What a lucky mom you are, and that the caring action of your son brought not only good memories back, but created the urge in you to revisit your writing. Good luck and enjoy the ride!

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    1. Yes, I am. One of those times you're glad you let them survive childhood!

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  7. Excellent advice, my friend! Yes, I know. Get back on that horse.

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  8. What an adorable grandson you have Nancy! Future heartbreaker for sure! Kudos to your son for realizing the real importance of that goose & saving it for you. It's often easier to let things go rather than invest time to see if they're worth saving. Like most writers, I have some stories that warrant a second look. Thanks for sharing your story...it's very motivating. :)

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    1. Thanks, Sandra! Lost treasures, for sure!

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  9. Great story, Nancy. What a terrific son you have. Congrats. (Grandson and daughter-in-law too, I'm sure!).

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  10. That was nice of him!
    I'm a big believer in the stories we've stuck in a drawer. My first published novel was a story that sat in drawer for thirty years.
    Time to revisit those gems...

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  11. What a wonderful son you have, Nancy. You reminded me about those stories (finished, rejected, etc.) that I've lugged from house to house and are just sitting gathering dust.

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  12. I can't believe I missed this earlier. I love this story, and yes, you do have a great family. Your old books...well, you know those need to be saved!

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